Washington Cattle

at WAcattle.com

Updated Harvard BSE risk analysis released July 26, 2006 Yesterday, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) held a briefing about the updated BSE risk assessment (http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Science/Risk_Assessments/index.asp) it commissioned from the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. A Reuters article about the news leads with the report finding that “The U.S. government virtually eliminated the threat of mad cow disease to consumers by requiring the removal of brains, spinal cords and other high risk items from older cattle” (http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060725/3/2nm0y.html). Representatives from the Consumer advocacy groups Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and Consumers Union (CU) were quoted in the Reuters story. Caroline Smith DeWaal from CSPI said the government hasn’t been as proactive as it could be while CU’s Michael Hansen claimed the report was designed to find what the government wanted it to. Harvard conducted its initial BSE Risk Assessment in 2001 and then updated it in 2003. This time, FSIS asked the Harvard risk modeling experts to gauge the effectiveness of new safeguards implemented since December 2003 and determine the need for further controls. Even assuming a much greater rate of BSE incidence than the authors say is likely and imperfect feed ban compliance, the report finds the food safety measures enacted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture all reduce potential human exposure to BSE infectivity. Although the Authors detail the risk reduction achieved by individual safeguard measures – removing downer cattle from the human food supply and removing specified risk materials (SRMs) – they also remind that these are reductions relative to what already is a small risk. Harvard also looked at the additional feed ban controls proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the International Review Team recommendations. The authors say banning ruminant blood in ruminant feed and dedicated production lines would have little effect on disease spread. Instead, the report finds that removing SRMs from dead stock prior to rendering and banning all animal-derived protein from cattle feed would be most effective in reducing the already low risk of BSE spreading in the U.S. cattle herd. Harvard has always attributed its findings to the strong safeguard measures the United States started implementing early on. The United States was the first country in the world to institute a feed ban before any BSE cases were found. In addition, the U.S. started its active BSE surveillance program in 1990. Since then, the United States has tested nearly 1 million cattle, particularly older cattle that are at greater risk for the disease, and found only two cases. As a result of industry and government actions beginning in 1989 and, now quantified in the Harvard report, BSE risk in the United States is very low resulting in the full protection of public and animal health. ...More


USDA Livestock Reports

Northwest Direct Cattle WA-OR-ID (Fri)

Toppenish, WA Monthly Dairy Cattle Auction

Stockland Livestock Wtd Avg Report (Tue)

Northwest Wtd Avg Direct Feeder Cattle Report (Fri)

Toppenish, WA Livestock Auction (Fri)

Stockland Livestock Auction - Davenport, WA (Tue)

Washington Weekly Combined Cattle (Fri)

 
cattletoday.xml

IT'S THE PITTS -- DRONING ON AND ON
You can't pick up an ag publication these days without finding a story on how drones will revolutionize the cow business.
APPALACHIAN CLASSIC CHAROLAIS SALE HELD JUNE 3
A moderate crowd was on hand to evaluate an excellent set of cattle, very well presented in excellent sale condition.
MARKETING CATTLE AT PROPER TIME IS KEY TO PROFITS
Marketing cattle efficiently and at the proper time can make money for the producer. There are many costs involved in getting cattle to market and it is important to try to minimize those costs. Many cattle producers do a good job of getting the calves born, keeping them healthy, minimizing sickness and death loss, but only do an average or even a poor job of marketing those calves and thus reduce their potential profit.
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- FISHING FLIES
There's no telling how many inventions and pastimes, good, bad and pointless, are borne by idleness. Not laziness, mind you, but willing, busy minds and hands forced to wait.
BLACK INK -- RISE ABOVE THE CYCLE
Is this a good time to expand your cow herd, now that the U.S. beef cattle industry is deep into a fourth year of its rebuilding phase? The consensus has a short answer: no.
SBBA FIELD DAY & IBBA CONFERENCE TO BE HELD
The Southeast Brangus Breeders Association (SBBA) will host a cattlemen's gathering at the Seminole Indian Reservation in Brighton, Florida, on Friday, Aug. 18.
TAKE MEASURES TO KEEP FACE FLY POPULATIONS DOWN
The economic injury level of face flies, a common pest of pastured cattle, is only 10 insects per animal.
FIRST-CALF HEIFERS REQUIRE DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT
First-calf heifers. Let's face it – we all struggle with them at least to some degree. And it's an issue that we face not just here in Tennessee, but across the entire country.
GENETRUST SALE AT CAVENDER'S RANCH HELD APRIL 22
A capacity crowd gathered at Cavender's picturesque Neches River Ranch to evaluate the largest offering of registered Brangus and Ultrablack females presented anywhere in the spring of 2017.
PRODUCERS FIND SUCCESS GRAZING COVER CROPS
Interest in planting cover crops on Mississippi row crop acres continues to grow, along with interest in adding livestock grazing on those acres. Cover crops have been used by growers of cash crops for many years to solve a number of problems. Erosion, water quality, nutrient loss, compaction, organic matter, and conversion to no-till planting have all been addressed by the use of cover crops
REMOTE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS AREA GAINING POPULARITY
Remote drug delivery (RDD) systems, or dart guns, are being used more and more frequently throughout the beef industry for the delivery of antibiotics.
KNOWLEDGE OF GRAZING BEHAVIOR CAN AID MANAGEMENT
As ruminants, cattle can eat a lot of forage in a short time. Understanding and taking grazing behavior into account can help stockmen optimize production when managing cattle on pastures.
MANAGE FORAGES IN ANTICIPATION OF NEXT DROUGHT
A few years ago we were in the midst of one of the worst droughts in US history. It had huge implications on the beef cattle producer as well as most of production agriculture. Fortunately, these conditions passed, moisture conditions improved in most areas and we were back to “normal.”
IT'S THE PITTS -- MY MOST MEMORABLE VACATIONS
It's summer and many Americans are on vacation. But not my wife and I.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- INDEXING OPPORTUNITIES
“Selection indices, to me, are the most valuable tool we have to help us make more right decisions and fewer mistakes,” says Donnell Brown of R.A. Brown Ranch at Throckmorton, Texas.

These are a few of the topics being discussed on our Forum.
Just click on the topic to read it. Why not join the discussion?

Washington Cattle Links

Ag Universities

Government Agencies