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Updated Harvard BSE risk analysis released July 26, 2006 Yesterday, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) held a briefing about the updated BSE risk assessment (http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Science/Risk_Assessments/index.asp) it commissioned from the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. A Reuters article about the news leads with the report finding that “The U.S. government virtually eliminated the threat of mad cow disease to consumers by requiring the removal of brains, spinal cords and other high risk items from older cattle” (http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060725/3/2nm0y.html). Representatives from the Consumer advocacy groups Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and Consumers Union (CU) were quoted in the Reuters story. Caroline Smith DeWaal from CSPI said the government hasn’t been as proactive as it could be while CU’s Michael Hansen claimed the report was designed to find what the government wanted it to. Harvard conducted its initial BSE Risk Assessment in 2001 and then updated it in 2003. This time, FSIS asked the Harvard risk modeling experts to gauge the effectiveness of new safeguards implemented since December 2003 and determine the need for further controls. Even assuming a much greater rate of BSE incidence than the authors say is likely and imperfect feed ban compliance, the report finds the food safety measures enacted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture all reduce potential human exposure to BSE infectivity. Although the Authors detail the risk reduction achieved by individual safeguard measures – removing downer cattle from the human food supply and removing specified risk materials (SRMs) – they also remind that these are reductions relative to what already is a small risk. Harvard also looked at the additional feed ban controls proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the International Review Team recommendations. The authors say banning ruminant blood in ruminant feed and dedicated production lines would have little effect on disease spread. Instead, the report finds that removing SRMs from dead stock prior to rendering and banning all animal-derived protein from cattle feed would be most effective in reducing the already low risk of BSE spreading in the U.S. cattle herd. Harvard has always attributed its findings to the strong safeguard measures the United States started implementing early on. The United States was the first country in the world to institute a feed ban before any BSE cases were found. In addition, the U.S. started its active BSE surveillance program in 1990. Since then, the United States has tested nearly 1 million cattle, particularly older cattle that are at greater risk for the disease, and found only two cases. As a result of industry and government actions beginning in 1989 and, now quantified in the Harvard report, BSE risk in the United States is very low resulting in the full protection of public and animal health. ...More


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Northwest Direct Cattle WA-OR-ID (Fri)

Toppenish, WA Monthly Dairy Cattle Auction

Stockland Livestock Wtd Avg Report (Tue)

Northwest Wtd Avg Direct Feeder Cattle Report (Fri)

Toppenish, WA Livestock Auction (Fri)

Stockland Livestock Auction - Davenport, WA (Tue)

Washington Weekly Combined Cattle (Fri)

 
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BE PREPARED TO HANDLE CATTLE DURING WINTER
Winter weather if finally arriving and when it gets here for good we need to be prepared to handle and transport cattle appropriately.
GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION TO HOST SYMPOSIUM
All cattlemen and women are invited to attend the American Gelbvieh Association's (AGA) third annual commercial cattlemen's educational symposium titled Cattlemen's Profit Roundup.
STARTING A BACKGROUNDING PROGRAM TAKES PLANNING
Some ranchers hold calves over as yearlings to sell later/bigger, and some people buy light calves in the spring to put on grass and grow to a larger weight. Some put weaned calves into a confinement program--fed a growing ration until they are ready to go to a finishing facility.
THERE ARE CHALLENGES TO KEEPING FEEDLOT CALVES HEALTHY
It's harder today to keep calves healthy after they leave the ranch and enter a feedlot. Dr. Eugene Janzen (Assistant Dean, Clinical Practice, Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary) says there has been a lot of research in the past decades looking at pharmaceutics—vaccines and antibiotics.
TEXAS AG LOSSES FROM HARVEY ESTIMATED AT $200 MILLION
Hurricane Harvey, which decimated parts of South Central Texas and the upper Gulf Coast, caused more than $200 million in crop and livestock losses, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economists.
IT'S THE PITTS -- DELIVER US FROM EVIL
Did you see where Amazon, the fourth most valuable company in the world, bought Whole Foods? This has the trillion dollar grocery industry all atwitter and even has Wal Mart shakin' in its shorts. So much so that it came up with the idea of delivering the groceries you order online right to your refrigerator.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- FLATTER BUT BROADER
While cattle markets since the first of the year continue to amaze, apparently widespread profits across industry sectors cloud the notion of how long and far the nation's cowherd will continue to expand.
BLOAT RISKS INCREASE WITH COOLER WEATHER AND FROST
Bloat generally occurs when there's a change to higher protein feeds, such as from grass to alfalfa, according to Dr. James England (University of Idaho Caine Center).
DEATH CAUSED BY TOXICITY IN HERDS CAN BE FRUSTRATING
Both nitrate/nitrite and ammonia/urea toxicity in cattle can cause multiple deaths in a herd with few clinical signs and few to no gross or microscopic lesions of animals who die. These deaths can be frustrating for farmers and veterinarians and can present a diagnostic challenge to pathologists.
ALABAMA CONNECTION SALE AVERAGES $4,552
The Alabama Connection Santa Gertrudis Sale was held October 7, 2017 in Cullman, Ala.
MID SOUTH BULL SALE AND NEAL FAMILY HEIFER SALE HELD
The Mid South Bull and Neal Family Commercial Heifer Sale was held September 15, 2017 in St. Francisville, La.
AUBURN RESEARCH AIMS TO DETERMINE HEIFER FERTILITY
The seeds for Paul Dyce's animal science research were planted early in his life, while working on the family farm in Ontario, Canada.
FAIR EXHIBITORS MUST FOLLOW GOOD HEALTH MANAGEMENT
Livestock show season can be a very exciting and busy time for exhibitors and their families. Even if you do not directly participate in livestock exhibitions, attending the Fair or helping your neighbor with their kid's projects can serve as a risk to the health of your own herd.
DO NOT IGNORE VACCINE FUNDAMENTALS
Even in this technological age, it's the simple things we do that are usually the most effective. You can buy a fancy, expensive pickup with all the gadgets but if you don 't maintain it right, it won't last. You can buy the best genetics, but if you don't manage them right they won't perform as expected. It's the same with our common management procedures. If we ignore the fundamentals, we will not achieve our purpose.
MAKE SURE CALVES GAIN IMMUNITY AGAINST DISEASE
Whether a person is fall calving or spring calving, making sure calves gain adequate immunity against disease is an important part of cattle management.

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